Archive for the ‘social marketing’ Category

It’s Awards Season! And this one’s for you

Sunday, February 9th, 2020

The NOW Group and our clients’ campaigns are nominated for six Reed Awards

Roll out the red carpet!

It’s Oscars Sunday in Hollywood. And if you’re anything like us, you’re stocking up on snacks for the big show.

But there’s more to awards season than just the Oscars.

The NOW team is thrilled to be a finalist for six Reed Awards, including Best International Firm. The Reed Awards honour the best in political communications from the US and internationally, and this year’s awards will be handed out in Atlanta on February 20th.

“Earning a designation as a Reed Award Finalist isn’t easy. Thousands of entries compete, but very few make the cut. So if you’re a Reed Awards Finalist, know you’re in good company.”
– Shane D’Aprile, Co-Publisher, Campaigns & Elections

The NOW Group is pretty unique for an ad agency. Sure, we like trophies as much as anyone! But our work isn’t about us winning awards.

It’s about helping people win.

We work with incredible organizations to strengthen public services, protect working families, and build stronger communities. And when our work is nominated, the recognition belongs to all of our clients and partners across the country. They’re doing important work every day – and we’re honoured to help them reach, grow, and move their audiences.

Here’s just a taste of some of the work we did in 2019, as nominated by the Reed Awards.

Best International TV Advertisement – It Takes a Teacher – BCTF
Best International Online Video (Sub-National) – It Takes a Teacher – BCTF
Best Advocacy Advertising Campaign (Grassroots) – BCTF

“It Takes A Teacher” has a great message: Investing in kids and their teachers is crucial in an ever-changing world. We matched that message with superb performances and meticulous attention to sound design – including the memorable squeak of a shoe on the basketball court. We’re thrilled for BC Teachers’ that their campaign is nominated.

Best Canadian TV Advertisement – Moments – ETFO

Together, we created an ad that emphasizes the common ground between teachers and parents: The shared sense of responsibility for children. The impact of the ad relies on striking a genuine emotional chord – and this ad achieves it with first-rate, authentic performances and beautiful production values. It’s great to see ETFO’s ad nominated.

Best Canadian Use of Outdoor Advertising – Post-Secondary Sexual Violence Prevention – Government of British Columbia

These ads needed to be impossible to miss – because the message cannot be ignored. Sex without consent is rape. The posters have been displayed on campuses throughout the province, as well as in bars and clubs. The website on the posters, SafeCampusesBC.ca, directs users to an information hub where they can get help immediately, learn more, and spread the word.

Image of two people at a bar with the caption "Drunk is not yes"

Best International Firm – The NOW Group

For over 25 years, NOW has been creating winning campaigns for good causes. And we can’t wait to see what we create together in 2020. Together, let’s do some good!

Get me rewrite! Study says many union print ads aren’t connecting with audiences

Thursday, January 29th, 2015

Photo of a stack of newspapers

Two University of Saskatchewan researchers are about to publish a must-read study about union communications—specifically, print advertising.

Professors Barb Phillips and Dionne Pohler studied 177 union ads spanning five years, and while “unions are doing a better job on advertising than the researchers thought,” they could be doing a lot better.

“[T]he ads were often far too text heavy, often did not have a call to action, and missed the mark on answering the ‘what-does-this-mean-for-me’ question, particularly when it came to providing an understanding of what unions do for the general public,” according to the university website. “They also found that many union ads too frequently focused on strikes.”

Of course when a strike is underway and your audience is being affected, it’s important to keep communicating, and avoid leaving the conversation exclusively to management. But an effective strategy involves communicating and building support, trust and relationships long before a strike is on the horizon.

And it requires communicating based on your audience’s values, needs and experiences. The study’s authors suggest unions “focus on what they do for society to build good will with the public.”

The study hasn’t been published yet, so we’re not sure exactly how the authors mean this, but we’d frame it more sharply. “Society” doesn’t vote, decide where to shop, or phone their elected representatives; individual people do. Building public support requires you to show your audience how unions benefit them personally.

And there’s another factor we hope the study addresses, one that comes up frequently for us in our work with public- and private-sector unions: the need to engage your members as well as your external audiences. Often labour communications are aimed as much at reinforcing internal solidarity in the face of management attacks, or at mobilizing members to take action, as they are at persuading members of the public. Reconciling messages crafted for those different audiences is one of the biggest challenges unions face.

But that aside, what we’ve seen so far suggests this study could open a lot of eyes. It reinforces much of what NOW’s Paul Degenstein said a few years ago in his manifesto Reviving Labour’s Image, when he urged unions to “Make friends – because when you need a friend, it’s too late to make one,” “Know your audience” and “Talk about them, not you.” It amplifies what Marie Della Mattia told the Canadian Labour Congress Political Action Conference two years ago, when she said “Our real power is when you talk about what’s in it for everyone,” and advised attendees to ask themselves, “Are my words and actions telling everyone, every day, that I care about them?” And it underscores Joanne Deer’s bargaining communications tips published just last month on the Canadian Association of Labour Media blog.

NOW was founded in 1992 to help bring a new communications discipline to the Canadian left, grounded in modern methods and strategies. Progressive communications have come a long way in Canada since then, but this study makes it clear there’s still a lot of room for improvement.

When breast cancer awareness comes first-hand

Tuesday, October 29th, 2013

Pink maple leafEvery year when October comes around, I notice the colour pink more than the yellows and reds of fall leaves. I’m reminded that it’s Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

As a breast cancer fighter and survivor, I know that a breast cancer diagnosis can be scary, and thoughts of dying are one of the first to enter a newly diagnosed patient’s mind.

But despite the fear, we are lucky that we live in a country where breast cancer awareness is growing and cancer specialists, health technicians, nurses, doctors, caregivers and researchers are both capable and caring.

And that’s one more reason the fight to ensure quality public health care for all Canadians is so important. With growing awareness of what to look for when checking for breast health, more and more women are getting diagnosed earlier meaning returning to good health is faster and more likely.

One of the goals of the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation is to achieve a future without breast cancer by the year 2020. With donations collected through the CIBC Run for the Cure and fundraising events around the county, more money is being put into research, putting them closer to that goal.

And wouldn’t that be an amazing accomplishment for all of us: not having to fear dying from this cancer or having to sacrifice a breast. Be breast aware, and help support efforts to eradicate this disease from the minds, hearts and breasts of women you love.

Telling the real story of collective bargaining: CUPE Ontario

Thursday, January 31st, 2013

Still image from the ad, showing a worker shaking hands with an employerCommunicating around specific issues can be highly effective, often involving focused messages, sharply defined goals and tangible outcomes.

But sometimes you’re aiming higher. You want to change not just opinions on an issue, but the underlying attitudes, assumptions and narrative that drive those opinions.

When Ontario’s Liberal government targeted collective bargaining rights for school board workers with Bill 115, CUPE Ontario recognized it as the first assault in a campaign against fundamental rights for all public employees. And they saw that assault as part of the right-wing narrative about collective bargaining: that it always results in inefficiency and conflict, disrupting services and holding back economic growth. (more…)